2010

Authors

  • Jennifer Whitty Jennifer Whitty
  • Simon Stewart Simon Stewart
  • Melinda J. Carrington Melinda J. Carrington
  • Alicia Calderone Alicia Calderone
  • Thomas Marwick Thomas Marwick
  • John D. Horowitz John D. Horowitz
  • Henry Krum Henry Krum
  • Patricia M. Davidson Patricia M. Davidson
  • Peter S. Macdonald Peter S. Macdonald
  • Christopher Reid Christopher Reid
  • Paul Scuffham Paul Scuffham

Background Beyond examining their overall cost-effectiveness and mechanisms of effect, it is important to understand patient preferences for the delivery of different modes of chronic heart failure magement programs (CHF-MPs). We elicited patient preferences around the characteristics and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for a clinic or home-based CHF-MP. Methodology/Principal Findings A Discrete Choice Experiment was completed by a sub-set of patients (n = 91) enrolled in the WHICH? trial comparing home versus clinic-based CHF-MP. Participants provided 5 choices between hypothetical clinic and home-based programs varying by frequency of nurse consultations, nurse continuity, patient costs, and availability of telephone or education support. Participants (aged 71ᱳ yrs, 72.5% male, 25.3% NYHA class III/IV) displayed two distinct preference classes. A latent class model of the choice data indicated 56% of participants preferred clinic delivery, access to group CHF education classes, and lower cost programs (p<0.05). The remainder preferred home-based CHF-MPs, monthly rather than weekly visits, and access to a phone advice service (p<0.05). Continuity of nurse contact was consistently important. No significant association was observed between program preference and participant allocation in the parent trial. WTP was estimated from the model and a dichotomous bidding technique. For those preferring clinic, estimated WTP was 聕$9-20 per visit; however for those preferring home-based programs, WTP varied widely (AU$15-105). Conclusions/Significance Patient preferences for CHF-MPs were dichotomised between a home-based model which is more likely to suit older patients, those who live alone, and those with a lower household income; and a clinic-based model which is more likely to suit those who are more socially active and wealthier. To optimise the delivery of CHF-MPs, health care services should consider their patients' preferences when designing CHF-MPs.