2010

Authors

  • Mei-Chi Hsu Mei-Chi Hsu
  • Wendy Moyle Wendy Moyle
  • Debra Creedy Debra Creedy
  • Lorraine Venturato Lorraine Venturato
  • Wen-Chen Ouyang Wen-Chen Ouyang
  • Gwo-Ching Sun Gwo-Ching Sun

Aims. To investigate patients' attitudes toward complementary and altertive medicine, the education nurses provided about complementary and altertive medicine for treating depression and to test whether such education mediates the effect of complementary and altertive medicine use and attitudes toward complementary and altertive medicine. Background. Although we know that attitudes influence behaviour, very few studies simultaneously explore the relationship between attitudes, education and complementary and altertive medicine use. Design. Survey. Methods. This study was conducted as part of a larger survey, using face-to-face survey interviews with 206 adult patients aged 50 years or over and hospitalised in conventiol hospitals in Taiwan for treatment of depression. The attitudes toward complementary and altertive medicine and patient education about complementary and altertive medicine instruments were specially developed for the study. Results. Participants expressed slightly favourable attitudes toward complementary and altertive medicine. Many participants (50%) expressed that they were willing to try any potential treatment for depression. They believed that complementary and altertive medicine helped them to feel better and to live a happier life. However, 66絥 of participants reported that they had idequate knowledge of complementary and altertive medicine. Participants with a higher monthly income, longer depression duration and religious beliefs hold more positive attitudes toward complementary and altertive medicine. Most participants were not satisfied with the education they received about complementary and altertive medicine. Patient education about complementary and altertive medicine was found to be a mediator for the use of complementary and altertive medicine. Conclusion. Patient education from nurses may predict patients' attitudes toward complementary and altertive medicine. Continuing nursing education is needed to eble nurses to respond knowledgeably to concerns patients may have about complementary and altertive medicine and treatment options. Relevance to clinical practice. This study highlights the potential role of patient education about complementary and altertive medicine as an effective way of adjusting patients' attitudes toward complementary and altertive medicine and to link both patients' preferences for complementary and altertive medicine and health professiols' concerns about the proper use of complementary and altertive medicine for depression magement and adverse drug interactions.