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Dr Aspa Baroutsis

Dr

Aspa Baroutsis

Research Fellow
Griffith Institute for Educational Research
+61 (0)7 3735 1174 (Work)
M10 5.19, Mount Gravatt Campus

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PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

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MEDIA LINKFEATURED
3 Feb 2020
Dr Aspa Baroutis, a Research Fellow with the Griffith Institute for Educational Research talks about how teachers and teaching are framed in newspapers.
BLOG
5 Dec 2019
Schooling is not always a pleasant experience for children and young people. School experiences can be alienating for some and can lead to marginalisation, disengagement and risk of dropping out of school completely. Almost one in five young people are affected this way. For disenfranchised children such as these, alternative schooling can offer a second chance at meaningful learning.
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP
Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE)
1 Jun 2019 - 30 Jun 2020
COMMITTEE/SOCIETY OR ASSOCIATION ROLE
2019 - 2019
Member
BLOG
17 Sep 2018
Teachers in Australian schools today are facing increasing pressures to move to more didactic, teacher-centred approaches to teaching. However, these traditional ‘top-down’ pedagogies (teaching methods), where a teacher is often at the front of the classroom ‘transmitting’ knowledge, are increasingly being supplemented by other teaching methods including approaches based on digital technologies as teachers continue to find ways to foreground 21st century skills.
BLOG
19 Feb 2018
The term PISA-shock is now used widely within education circles. We would define PISA-shock as the impact of PISA results when those results are disjunctive with a nation’s self-perception of the quality of the schooling system.
GUEST / SPECIAL ISSUE EDITORSHIP
2018 - 2018
Other
BLOG
13 Dec 2017
We live in interesting times. We see global social media campaigns such as #MeToo, #BlackLivesMatter and #illRideWithYou responding to social, economic and political injustices, while on the other hand we see evidence of behaviours motivated by self-interest such as a presidential campaign and presidency that appears to be run through social media. An unintended consequence of the rise of social media as a means of delivering interactive news is that there has been a shift in legacy media, such as newspapers. In Australia, and possibly other parts of the world, this shift has created a niche market for newspapers that seek to enhance influence over politics.
BLOG
21 Aug 2017
You couldn’t miss the headlines and page one stories across Australia recently about the decline of Australian children’s writing skills. The release of results of national tests in literacy and numeracy meant we were treated to a range of colour-coded tables and various info graphics that highlighted ‘successes’ and ‘failures’ and that dire, downward trend. A few reports were quite positive about improved reading scores and an improvement in writing in the early years of schooling. However, most media stories delivered the same grim message that Australian students have a ‘major problem’ with writing.
BLOG
24 Aug 2014
Newspapers are able to influence public opinion through specific portrayals of teachers that in turn work to construct particular knowledge and perceptions about teachers and their work. So what are newspapers saying about teachers and who is saying it in the Australian press?
MEDIA LINK
Deviant, demanding and failing our students: what the news media really say about teachers.
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP
British Education Research Association (BERA)
PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP
Queensland College of Teachers (QCT)